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The Davis-Monthan Airfield Register

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Military Aircraft of the Davis Monthan Register, 1925-1936

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CLOYD PEART CLEVENGER

 

C.P. Clevenger, Ca. 1927-28
(Source: Hudgin)
C.P. Clevenger, Ca. 1927-28 (Source: Hudgin)

 

Cloyd Clevenger, "Clev," landed once at Pitcairn Field, on June 13, 1928. He was solo in the Alexander Eaglerock NC5768. He learned to fly early and participated in the barnstorming craze of the early 1920s. One of his escapades as a barnstormer was authored by him in an article for Popular Aviation (PA) magazine, August, 1940 (PDF 1.3Mb) available at the link.

During 1927-28 he was chief pilot for the Alexander Aircraft Factory, Colorado Springs; pilot in the Ford National Air Tours 1927-28, and pilot for Garland Aircraft, Tulsa, OK in 1929.

He also landed once and signed the Register at the Davis-Monthan Airfield on July 10, 1928. He also flew an Alexander Eaglerock, NC6505. He was participating in the National Air Tour for 1928 on that occasion. He placed 18th in the event.

Soon after we find him at Willow Grove and Tucson, In 1930 he was in Mexico. He operated Clevenger Flying School in Mexico City. He was an instructor and salesman from1931-32, and pilot for Mexican Airlines 1932-35. He returned to the U.S. and became a ferry pilot and skywriter during 1936. He then returned to Mexico where he was pilot for the Spanish Embassy in 1937. Back in the U.S. he performed aerial mapping for Pan American Aerial Surveys in Mississippi in 1938. Also in 1938 he was jailed for a year and a day on charges of violating the United States Neutrality Act by smuggling planes out of the country for use in the Spanish Civil War.

Why the migration back and forth between the U.S. and Mexico? We need to step back and consider the times. Clevenger, like many of his vocation, was faced with a difficult economic picture during the 1930s. Part of what can be perceived as job-hopping was undoubtedly an effect of the Great Depression. Ruth Reinhold in this REFERENCE summarized that environment nicely (p. 184):

"The Depression continued to inflict deep wounds on the aviation industry. Pilots changed jobs, airlines changed schedules and cut fares, and operators switched bases so rapidly that it was impossible to keep any accurate records. However, people still frequented the fields. For the unemployed any airport promised an economical and rewarding place to spend a few hours. There was always the chance of seeing a celebrity -- or an accident. A Coke cost only a nickel and most airports had penny candy or gum machines. One could spend a frugal afternoon with exciting possibilities, the ultimate being an invitation for a free ride."

Clevenger's biography is online at the Davis-Monthan Airfield Register Web site at the link.

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THIS PAGE UPLOADED: 06/13/13 REVISED: 07/09/14